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Joyfully Bea

Tara Brach is a celebrated teacher and activist who founded the Insight Meditation Community of Washington fifteen years ago. In February Brach released her new book True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart,the follow up to the book that made her famous, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha.

So I drove out to her house deep in the woods of Northern Virginia – an actual fox trotted up her driveway just as I arrived – to talk with her about her work, her life, and what it’s like to walk a spiritual path. This is the final installment in an ongoing series.

Beandrea: You have said that therapists are like the shamans of our time. What do you mean by that?

Brach: Most everyone I know has encountered something difficult where having someone else that is trustworthy and wise helped them to begin to unpack it, unfold it, digest it. We all need other people, and sometimes, skilled others that can help us. I think of it as like sangha [community]. It’s taking refuge in loving relationships. Psychotherapy – that’s one form of loving relationship that can be really helpful.

Beandrea: As a psychotherapist, what do you think mindfulness has to offer traditional psychotherapy?

Brach:: There is a huge kind of synergy going on between the worlds of meditation and psychotherapy. Psychologists want to know how to train in mindfulness, and it is being integrated into [traditional] psychotherapy. I did a whole training for therapists on how to start integrating these practices. There’s usually more attention to the stories often in the traditional forms of psychotherapy, which is fine, and even in mediation you can use a story as a portal into an experience. But in meditation what you’re doing is you’re training yourself, so that even when you’re not with a therapist you have a way to pause and really discover what is going on inside you. You’re not dependent on a therapist to help you unpack your own experience.

I have found that for most kinds of emotional suffering unless you allow yourself compassion there’s not going to be any real shift. When we’re learning to take refuge in the present moment, it’s recognizing and allowing what’s going on, it’s beginning to inquire, it’s the self-compassion.
What allows us to have self-compassion is when we really get that we’re suffering. When I get, ‘Oh I’m really down on myself, and that hurts.’ And I don’t say, ‘well other people have it worse.’ or, ‘well but I deserve to be down on myself. I should really get my act together.’

Beandrea: One of the things I’ve found interesting about your books is the personal stories of people you’ve worked with and how they have moved through the issues in their life with your support. It’s useful to get glimpses of how people have handled what they experienced. And at the same time, I wondered ‘is there always a happy ending?’

Brach:: No, not at all. For some of the stories you heard the story over a few years and if you had caught them in year one and a half, I would’ve said still struggling, and even after the happy ending still struggling because the patterns still emerge, there’s just more of a capacity to know ‘Oh this is what’s going on and I can handle it.’ I still get into slumps. I get scared. I can turn on myself and feel bad about myself. I feel guilty. All that stuff still comes up, there’s just less lag time until I recognize what’s going on and say ‘okay, come back, come back.’ I don’t believe so much in the story my mind is telling me.

Beandrea: It seems to me that’s what is different from self-help writ large where the idea is ‘make over your life and everything will be better.’ This is a radically different thing, which is saying ‘well your life may or may not get better necessarily but you’ll be able to handle it or you’ll be able to cope with a different way.’

Brach:: When you start training in mindful awareness and you start loosening the grip and start letting things be as they are, in a way you feel like your world is falling apart. You’re no longer so confident that you’re right about certain things. That people should do things a certain way. All your shoulds come into question. It’s like the world is turning topsy-turvy and it can feel a little insane. That’s a sign of increasing freedom. And if you have the courage to tolerate the uncertainty you start finding out in a much more deep way this aliveness, this richness, this mystery of who you are. But it takes tolerating uncertainty so it’s groundlessness. And at first it feels really scary, and then it starts feeling spacious and freeing.

Beandrea: To some activists who are concerned about the world, finding peace within doesn’t seem to be enough. How would you respond to that?

Brach: Spiritual life includes activism. I really don’t think it’s enough to just sit on the cushions. I think that to be congruent we need to sit on the cushion and then when we are talking with each other to live that kindness and to be generous and to expand. And you know one of the interesting things when you start researching compassion the parts of the brain that light up when you start to awaken compassion are in the motor cortex. Which means not only do you feel this tenderness of ‘oh you’re suffering, I care about it,’ but there’s actually an impetus to move and do something about it. So it’s the same thing with any spiritual practice. It’s just like you are awakening the conscious and the natural expression of that is to reach out.

For me right now the major project that I’m excited about is bringing mindfulness into the school systems, and we’re doing a teacher training, a mindfulness teacher training here with 65 people in the Washington area…We are also working on a program to help the prisons. So I don’t separate it so much. I just feel like each of us is finding our own form of expression. If you don’t wake up and cultivate awareness then all the activism in the world is going to eventually seed the same violence and greed, but if you can do it from a more awake place there’s the possibility of it really serving the healing of our world.

Copyright 2013. All rights Reserved. Please contact us for permission to reprint.



Relaxing into who we really are :: Interview with Tara Brach:: True Refuge (part III)

Tara Brach is a celebrated teacher and activist who founded the Insight Meditation Community of Washington fifteen years ago. In February Brach released her new book True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart,the follow up to the book that made her famous, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha.

So I drove out to her house deep in the woods of Northern Virginia – an actual fox trotted up her driveway just as I arrived – to talk with her about her work, her life, and what it’s like to walk a spiritual path. This is the third installment in an ongoing series.

Beandrea: Your work reminds me think of this quote from Jacob Needleman: “Seeing yourself as you really are is a great healing force, but in self help you’re chiefly working on the self you see. Spiritual change takes place when the seer, and not merely what is seen begins to change and deepen.” And that seems to be just what you’re just talking about. No quick fixes, right?

Brach: Yes, you’re not trying to make yourself into a better person. You’re trying to come home to who is really here, and that just takes time.

Beandrea: A lot of people today who just start meditating because they heard it would be good for them. Or you know they went to a mindfulness-based stress reduction class or come to your Wednesday night classes on River Road. What do you think about that?

Brach: People come for all different reasons, and there are definitely some people that are just really stressed out, and they get it, that if they do the mental exercise and meditation, their minds are going to shift to a place where there’s just a little bit more peace and freedom. And then some people come because there’s this very deep impression that who they are is mysterious and way more than they have really been spending time tending to. I find it doesn’t matter what level people are coming at, if you just start training your mind to be here, in that experience you find the silence. And you find the skills, and in that you find tenderness. You find that presence and reality itself is what wins you over. It’s what we’re longing for. And so that’s why I always say we’re not meditating to improve ourselves so we can become something different. Meditation actually deconditions all this chatter and reactivity so that we can relax back into who we actually are.

Beandrea: A hundred years or two hundred years from now it will be interesting to see what people say about this time we’re in. There is so much access to all these teachings that weren’t widely practiced or known about, and you had to go to the ashram or the monastery to learn about them.

Brach: And that is what’s so interesting about right now. It’s actually so out of the closet now. I mean even ten or fifteen years ago I would talk about meditation, and it was like this far out exotic thing. Now there have been over 10,000 research projects validating meditation. There are brain scans showing that when you direct your attention this way it correlates in your brain that way with positive emotion. No matter what we think mystically, training the mind to pay attention actually changes your mood. It changes your brain chemistry. It cultivates empathy and compassion. So science has really brought it into mainstream. Unlike anything else could have.

Beandrea: In reading True Refuge you talk about how our brains are wired to hang onto negative experiences and the positive ones are like Teflon. I felt relieved reading that.

Brach: You said ‘I’m not alone!’

Beandrea: Right, yes, and it’s not my fault! It’s just how I was made, you know? There’s so much emphasis on thinking positive these days.

Brach: I have found so many people get a glimmer of True Refuge through meditation, but then they quit because in some way the way the meditation structure they are given leaves them feeling like they’re not very good at it. People come to me to confide, ‘I’m really not cut out for this. I have a busy mind.’ As if they’re the only person in the world, and they’re confessing it. It’s really important to say right out front that the way that our brains are designed is to leave the present moment. It is part of our genetic inheritance to keep vigilant, to keep scanning our environment, to move to the future, to move into the past, to be a virtual reality. In our design we get lost in thoughts, and the more stressed the more quickly, it’s like being on bicycle, we start peddling away from that present and get lost in that virtual reality. So we’re going against the conditioning of our psyches, but the good news is we actually have what’s called self-reflective awareness – the capacity to notice that.

Copyright 2013. All rights Reserved. Please contact us for permission to reprint.



17 Seconds :: Interview with Tara Brach :: True Refuge (part II)

Tara Brach is a celebrated teacher and activist who founded the Insight Meditation Community of Washington fifteen years ago. This month Brach released her new book True Refuge: Finding Peace and Freedom in Your Own Awakened Heart,the follow up to the book that made her famous, Radical Acceptance: Embracing Your Life With the Heart of a Buddha.

So I drove out to her house deep in the woods of Northern Virginia – an actual fox trotted up her driveway just as I arrived – to talk with her about her work, her life, and what it’s like to walk a spiritual path. This is the second of four installments.

Beandrea: You often talk about the “trance of unworthiness” or the “trance of the small self.” Would you explain where this comes from?

Brach: On some level I always felt that I was letting somebody down. That I wasn’t enough as a mother or enough as a friend, a parent, a daughter. I was seeing it in myself and then as a psychotherapist with clients. Whomever I was working with, if we started looking below whatever the presenting issue was, there was that same sense of ‘I’m not good enough. I’m not enough.’

I started asking myself ‘well how come we feel that way? How does that happen?’ On one level we could say there’s an existential predicament, where any being that comes into existence feels separate. It’s almost like there’s this membrane where inside the membrane is ‘me,’ and everything else in the world is ‘out there,’ and hand in hand with that is the sense that something can go wrong. The primal mood of the separate self is fear. There’s a sense of ‘something’s wrong or something is going to wrong,’ and then through our personal history we sense that the something wrong is me. That ‘I am going to go wrong.’ And we blame it on other people too.

Some of us got more of those messages than others. Some of us were neglected, traumatized, abused. Depending on how severe the early experience of stress was, the transfer of abuse is thicker.

So with Radical Acceptance, to the degree that we can be aware, the sense of who we are enlarges and we’re not caught inside the trance. Radical Acceptance has two wings. One is to notice what’s happening. Okay, notice ‘feeling ashamed,’ notice thoughts of ‘I’m going to fail.’ And the second way is hold that with kindness and compassion.

Beandrea: I’m struck by the whole notion of how we’re taught to be good in society. The idea that you have to be educated, to strive and climb ladders, and that amps up that trance even more. That’s the sign that a person is doing well, that they are in the trance you’re describing.

Brach: Exactly. We have a culture where in order to belong you have to strive and you have achieve and you have to meet certain standards no matter what you’re doing. You have to have a certain kind of intelligence that matches our culture’s idea. Even though there are many, many kinds of intelligence, and for everybody that doesn’t have that kind of intelligence, they end up with that stamp of ‘not really smart.’

Beandrea: In your new book True Refuge, you talk about false refuges. You’ve already named some, but what are some of the common false refuges that people get caught in?

Brach: We all have our strategies for trying to make it. I often think of it like a space suit. We come into this world, and there are all these standards you’re supposed to meet, and you’re supposed to be a certain way, and it’s hard, and so to defend ourselves and prove ourselves we all take on strategies to make it through the day. They are false refuges because it’s a temporary fix. We feel better for the moment, but they don’t last.

An example is getting everything done. We have this thing where if we can just get things done, if we can check things off of a list, then we’ll be happy. But I can speak for myself, as soon as I’ve gotten something done I get a reprieve of maybe seventeen seconds. My mind is immediately fixed on what next needs to be done. So the self-soothing of getting things done is really temporary. Now sometimes we achieve certain things that give us a little bit more of a ride, but anyone that’s trying to achieve to feel okay about themselves will keep on having to achieve. There’s never enough.

Beandrea: So you notice in that seventeen seconds you’re being drawn to do another thing on the list. Do you then, mindfully do the next thing? Do you just notice that you want to do that next thing? Walk us through that discernment process.

Brach: So the first step is just noticing it, and then what you do when you notice is note that there is a false refuge in play. There’s a wonderful phrase that Victor Frankel says, which is “Between the stimulus and the response, there is a space, and in that space is our power and our freedom.” So the awareness when we recognize the false refuge creates a space. A little pause, and that makes all the difference. In that pause you may be able to decide to do something different. Or you may realize there’s still a real pull, but at least you can move through the false refuge with more awareness and be less identified with it.

Beandrea: So how you do that second thing on the to-do list matters? That you’re doing it from a different place?

Brach: Yes. Because if you’re more awake, if you’re more mindful, then you’re here, but if you’re in this trance of ‘I have got to get this done so that I can do that, so that I can feel better about this,’ you’ve missed out on your life.

Beandrea: And with the compassion and acceptance piece, even if you notice that you’re running to that second item on the to-do list and you’re still feeling stressed and anxious, there’s the compassion of ‘Today I’m not able to slow down and do that, but maybe someday I will.’

Brach: That’s essential. If you don’t, if you look at the false refuges like bad things that you have to overcome then it’s just another way of doing the trance. It’s patterning that got set in at a very early age. It was the best we could do at the time. It has its own organic time of releasing, but all you can do is offer presence, and then sometimes out of that presence there will actually be some sense of, ‘Well I actually don’t feel like I need to do that.’

Copyright 2013. All rights Reserved. Please contact us for permission to reprint.



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